Cornish-Windsor Bridge

Longest Covered Bridge

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U.S. Postal Commemorative, Jefferson National Expansion Memorial

St. Louis, Missouri

The landmark bridge accommodating two-way vehicular traffic between the towns of Cornish, New Hampshire, and Windsor, Vermont, is about 450 feet long.  It was constructed in 1866, at a cost of $9,000, and was a toll bridge until 1943.

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Image courtesy of Bill Wendt, GVCC

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cornish%E2%80%93Windsor_Covered_Bridge

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smolen-Gulf_Bridge

Wonders of America: Land of Superlatives Stamp Series@2005 United States Postal Service. All rights reserved. Used with Permission.

Commentary on bridges courtesy of Richard Smolen, GVCC.  — In seeing the list of Wonders of America I noticed the listing for the Longest Covered Bridge.  My brother, John Smolen was County Engineer for Ashtabula County, Ohio.  And as such, he was the designer for the Smolen-Gulf bridge (a surprise when it was named for him at the dedication) which is 613 feet long. I hope you can make a correction to the photo of the Windsor Bridge that is shown. The 2nd link above is a photo of the bridge and some information about the bridge.  The shortest covered bridge is also located in Ashtabula Co (Geneva, Ohio) and is 18 feet long.

Richard Smolen - WikipediaWikipedia commentary:  The Smolen–Gulf Bridge is a covered bridge which carries State Road (Ashtabula County Road 25) across the Ashtabula River at the Plymouth and Ashtabula Township line in northern Ashtabula County, Ohio, United States. At 613 feet (182.9 meters), it is the longest covered bridge in the United States – a title formerly held by the Cornish–Windsor Covered Bridge in New Hampshire – and the fourth longest covered bridge in the world. The bridge, one of 17 drivable covered bridges in the county, was designed by John Smolen, former Ashtabula County Engineer when the idea of bridging the Ashtabula River Gulf with a wooden structure was first conceived in 1995.